Miley Cyrus Sparks Outcry for Diverse and Politically Correct Emojies

Miley Cyrus Sparks Outcry for Diverse and Politically Correct EmojiesControversial singer kicks off global campaign to see more ethnic and social groups added to emoji ranks – apparently we’re not all pink and yellow after all!

Miley Cyrus has managed to spark one of the biggest social outcries in the history of the modern web, by insisting that emojis become more diversified and politically correct.

“RT if you think there needs to be an #emojiethnicityupdate” read the controversial singer’s Twitter post.

As it stands, the vast majority of emojis are bright yellow or pink, therefore don’t really take into account most of the world’s people of color…at least color in a planet Earth sense of the phrase.

The petition quickly began gathering names after its launch, arguing that while the current emoji archive covers a fair few bizarre bases, it also excludes massive user groups.

“If you look at Apple’s Emoji keyboard, what do you see? Two different camels. A smiling turd. EVERY PHASE OF THE MOON,” the petition reads.

“But of the more than 800 Emojis, the only two resembling people of color are a guy who looks vaguely Asian and another in a turban. There’s a white boy, girl, man, woman, elderly man, elderly woman, blonde boy, blonde girl and, we’re pretty sure, Princess Peach. But when it comes to faces outside of yellow smileys, there’s a staggering lack of minority representation.”

And now, Joey Parker of MTV fame went straight to Apple’s Tim Cook…in letter form at least…to ask precisely what the firm’s stance on the whole subject was. Cook was apparently too busy to reply in person, but did at least have one of his minions make a statement on Apple’s behalf.

“Tim forwarded your email to me. We agree with you,” wrote the Apple representative.

“Our emoji characters are based on the Unicode standard, which is necessary for them to be displayed properly across many platforms. There needs to be more diversity in the emoji character set, and we have been working closely with the Unicode Consortium in an effort to update the standard.”

Controversial singer kicks off global campaign to see more ethnic and social groups added to emoji ranks – apparently we’re not all pink and yellow after all!

Miley Cyrus has managed to spark one of the biggest social outcries in the history of the modern web, by insisting that emojis become more diversified and politically correct.

“RT if you think there needs to be an #emojiethnicityupdate” read the controversial singer’s Twitter post.

As it stands, the vast majority of emojis are bright yellow or pink, therefore don’t really take into account most of the world’s people of color…at least color in a planet Earth sense of the phrase.

The petition quickly began gathering names after its launch, arguing that while the current emoji archive covers a fair few bizarre bases, it also excludes massive user groups.

“If you look at Apple’s Emoji keyboard, what do you see? Two different camels. A smiling turd. EVERY PHASE OF THE MOON,” the petition reads.

“But of the more than 800 Emojis, the only two resembling people of color are a guy who looks vaguely Asian and another in a turban. There’s a white boy, girl, man, woman, elderly man, elderly woman, blonde boy, blonde girl and, we’re pretty sure, Princess Peach. But when it comes to faces outside of yellow smileys, there’s a staggering lack of minority representation.”

And now, Joey Parker of MTV fame went straight to Apple’s Tim Cook…in letter form at least…to ask precisely what the firm’s stance on the whole subject was. Cook was apparently too busy to reply in person, but did at least have one of his minions make a statement on Apple’s behalf.

“Tim forwarded your email to me. We agree with you,” wrote the Apple representative.

“Our emoji characters are based on the Unicode standard, which is necessary for them to be displayed properly across many platforms. There needs to be more diversity in the emoji character set, and we have been working closely with the Unicode Consortium in an effort to update the standard.”